Month: October 2017

If you look at ancient history in golf teaching—and by “ancient,” we mean 10 years ago—there were hints that the old green-grass, hands-on, eyes-on model was nearing its expiration date. Young people were less inclined to engage that way. Young, smart teachers were struggling to establish high profiles and fill their lesson books. The future
0 Comments
If you struggle with those less-than-full wedge shots and feel like you never know how far the ball is going to go, try my simple plan to make this a strength of your game. It’s all about distance control. Look at the two mini swing sequences of me hitting wedge shots. I’m regulating my backswing
0 Comments
You might think that all metalwoods are designed to do the same thing: launch it high with low spin. In a way they are, but they go about it in different ways. The newest metalwoods target certain types of swings: (1) big hitters who need shots to launch with less spin; (2) slower swingers who
0 Comments
Players who need the game-improvement trifecta of high launch, distance and forgiveness want irons that don’t trade on those characteristics. They want ultra-forgiving sets that maximize distance with oversize shapes or even hollow heads. That makes them almost like mini-drivers, with fast-flexing faces and stable bodies that help mis-hits fly closer to perfect. Their wide
0 Comments
This week’s WGC-HSBC Champions is the first event of the 2017-18 PGA Tour season for many of the world’s top golfers, so you might expect some of them to be a little rusty. Emphasis on “little,” because it wasn’t exactly a long off-season. But regardless of the situation, it’s still an odd sight to see
0 Comments
Matt Kuchar was the court jester of the 2016 U.S. Ryder Cup team, though most golf fans never would have known that. “His image with the public is a hundred percent different than who he really is,” says Zach Johnson, a close friend. “He smiles and says all the right things, and then you get
0 Comments
When he first saw the Dallas property that he and partner Ben Crenshaw would turn into the new Trinity Forest Golf Club—a drab, treeless, 165-acre tabletop city dump perched above the tree-lined Trinity River—golf architect Bill Coore ignored the abandoned refrigerators and scattered tires to focus on the flow of the land. It was a
0 Comments